Post Analog Painting II

Post Analog Painting II

Anne Vieux

Austin Lee

Ben Jones

Caroline Larsen

Drake Carr

Eric Shaw

Guy Yanai

Jeanette Hayes

Joe Reihsen

Jonathan Chapline

Josh Reames

Julie Curtiss

Keith Farquhar

Lauren Silva

Kristin Baker

Maja Djordjevic

Mariah Dekkenga

Mark Wehberg

Matthew Hansel

Matthew Stone

Michael Dotson

Morgan Blair

Robin F Williams

Royal Jarmon

Ry David Bradley

Trudy Benson

April 7th  – May 14th

OPENING: Friday, April 7th from 6–9pm

The Hole is proud to announce a second installment of our 2015 exhibition of digitally-influenced painting “Post Analog Painting” with an updated group of artists and approaches in “Post Analog Painting II” or PAPII. This sprawling thematic exhibition of digitally-minded painting includes both emerging and established artists working in a “post-analog” mode.

The long and complex shift in culture from analog to digital media is the most significant transformation of our generation, and it has long-reaching and manifold effects that continue to permeate all modes of visual expression. In painting the effects have been slow to reverberate: “inkjet on canvas” was the center of these discussions for many years while more subtle repercussions in style and content were ignored in favor of new media. In “Post Analog Painting”, 2015 we looked at some physical ways digital imaging manifested, with painted pixels and various print techniques or Photoshop tools. This year we look more finely at the idea of rendering in paint something influenced by how a computer renders an image.

The specific medium the artist uses, or having a step in the artistic process that happens in the computer, is less the idea. Digital tools have affected our way of thinking; the logic of Photoshop or structure of pixelation shapes a painter’s approach to color, form, light or texture even when away from their laptops. When Trudy Benson paints a circle, it’s the specific kind of sloppy shape a hand holding a mouse draws, not the shape a hand holding a brush would make. When Maja Djordjevic forms a figure it’s the rudimentary beast of Mac Paint, from her memory not a projector.

Content of paintings has been affected (in this show we have anime, EDM, MapQuest and Mortal Kombat) as well as meaning, as the viewer takes in the work or communicates the work. If the painting looks sharp in your smart phone, it will get shared and seen far beyond the gallery and proliferate in its impact: the push and pull between what inspires the work and how it is shared cycles onward as meaning, technique and reproduction accelerate. If anything, most painters impacted by digital tools fight against this by making physical objects that don’t read properly on Instagram and need to be seen in person, (“it’s not a JPEG!”) whether it’s the texture of a Mariah Dekkenga or the baffling lack of relief in these new Joe Reihsen paintings; the woven oil paint in Caroline Larsen’s work to the fine pixilation in the grooves of the Keith Farquhar.

“Post-Analog” is meant to suggest that the paintings in this show were not even conceivable before digital imaging changed the structure of our images. Sure, we erased things, but not the way the “erase tool” erases. Items at shallow depth leave shadows but not the way a drop-shadow filter does. Focus and resolution exist in emulsion photography but the way that paint is applied in this show has more in common with low-res JPEGS and pixels-per-inch. Many artists seek out early imaging programs and style; some artists in the show have even customized digital imaging programs with their own tools so they can sketch or prep their paintings with the exact distortions they crave. “Augment”, “3D Builder”, “Pixto”, MacPaint emulators or Google SketchUp, Illustrator, Maya and Photoshop provide a wide range of computer tools to fool around with; the fact that these tools were programmed by humans to mimic analog processes but never fully succeed at total verisimilitude is explored here in myriad slippages, errors and omissions.

Airbrush and spray are frequent tools of digitally-minded painters so that their IRL creations can have the soft-focus of low resolution or the seamless blend of a computer gradient. Neon, whether the painted faux-neon in Josh Reames or the glowing gas neon in the center panel of Djordjevic’s piece, satisfy that craving for light-from-behind to match our glowing screen lives. Neon acryla-gouache colors in Ben Jones paintings light up, while the layers of scraped thin acrylic build up on Kristin Baker’s PVC panels to make their own internal luminescence.

The topic of how digital imaging has changed the way artists today approach painting is too broad to tackle here but in the exhibition, some of the most interesting changes are the most subtle: Royal Jarmon doesn’t use computers, he paints quickly and from his imagination, so why does his junk-filled fire escape painting look like it was built up in a 3D rendering program? The call, in PAPII, might be coming from inside the house.

For more information on the exhibition email raymond@theholenyc.com.

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Kristin Baker, “Dense Trace”, 2016, acrylic on PVC, 44 x 30 inches, 112 x 76 cm

Kristin Baker, “Draw Against Light”, 2016, acrylic on PVC, 44 x 30 inches, 112 x 76 cm

Joe Reihsen, “Bismarck”, 2017, acrylic on panel, 55 x 43 inches, 140 x 110 cm

Joe Reihsen, “Dilemma… Pls Help”, 2017, acrylic on panel, 60 x 47 inches, 152.5 x 119.5 cm

Morgan Blair, “ExistentialRoundUP. Gov Top Weekly, Clicks: What Type of Motocross-Themed French Onion Chili Cheese Log Do You Need in Your Life”, 2017, acrylic and sand on canvas over panel, 60 x 60 inches, 152.5 x 152.5 cm

Trudy Benson, “Red Scatter”, 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas, 32 x 37 inches, 81.5 x 94 cm

Keith Farquhar, Woolmark, 2016, U.V. direct print on corrugated, galvanized steel, 96 x 79.5 x 1.5 inches, 244 x 202 x 4 cm

Mariah Dekkenga, “Untitled”, 2017, oil on linen, 51 x 37 inches, 129.5 x 94 cm

Mariah Dekkenga, “Untitled”, 2017, oil on linen, 51 x 37 inches, 129.5 x 94 cm

Eric Shaw, “No Wrong Way”, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36 inches, 122 x 91.5 cm

Anne Vieux, “//Primary Curve (Double Vision Series)”, 2017, acrylic on sublimation dyed faux suede, traces, frame, 72 x 50 inches, 183 x 127 cm

Mark Wehberg, “Golden Flowers”, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 24 inches, 76 x 61 cm

Mark Wehberg, “Density”, 2017, flashe and acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48 inches, 122 x 122 cm

Royal Jarmon, “Fire Escape”, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 54 inches, 152.5 x 137 cm

Jonathan Chapline, “Woman I”, 2017, acrylic on panel, 57 x 48 inches, 145 x 122 cm

Jonathan Chapline, “Constructed Objects on a Flat Plane”, 2017, acrylic on panel, 23.5 x 30 inches, 60 x 76 cm

Ry David Bradley, “Plato & Chill 1”, 2017, dye transfer on synthetic suede, 3D glasses, 48 x 62 inches, 122 x 157.5 cm

Ry David Bradley, “Plato & Chill 2”, 2017, dye transfer on synthetic suede, 3D glasses, 48 x 62 inches, 122 x 157.5 cm

Michael Dotson, “Check Up”, 2017, acrylic on panel, 40 x 30 inches, 101.5 x 76 cm

Austin Lee, “Kitten Study”, 2017, acrylic on linen, 12 x 16 inches, 30.5 x 40.5 cm

Jeanette Hayes, “Her”, 2017, oil on panel, 12 x 12 inches, 30.5 x 30.5 cm

Jeanette Hayes, “There Will Be Blood”, 2017, oil on panel,12 x 12 inches, 30.5 x 30.5 cm

Jeanette Hayes, “No Perk to Being a Wallflower”, 2017, oil on panel, 12 x 12 inches, 30.5 x 30.5 cm

Jeanette Hayes, “Top Gun”, 2017, oil on panel, 12 x 12 inches, 30.5 x 30.5 cm

Matthew Stone, “In His Own Heart”, 2017, digital print and acrylic on linen, 47 x 35.5 inches, 119.5 x 90 cm

Matthew Stone, “Two Distinct Internal Voices”, 2017, digital print and acrylic on linen, 32 x 24 inches, 81.5 x 61 cm

Julie Curtiss, “No Place Like Home”, 2017, acrylic and oil on panel, 24 x 36 inches, 61 x 91.5 cm

Julie Curtiss, “Three Widows”, 2016, acrylic and oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches, 76 x 76 cm

JCUR 4

Julie Curtiss, “Friends”, 2016, gouache on panel, 16 x 20 inches, 40.5 x 51 cm

Josh Reames, “Archaic Smile / Wealth and Taste”, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 84 x 144 inches, 213.5 x 366 cm

Matthew Hansel, “Doubting Thomas”, 2017, oil and flashe paint on linen, 60 x 48 inches, 152.5 x 122 cm

Matthew Hansel, “The Monsters of My Fancy Are Typical in Their Anguish”, 2016, oil and flashe paint on linen, 60 x 48 inches, 152.5 x 122 cm

Lauren Silva, “Bobber”, 2013, oil and acrylic on canvas, 96 x 144 inches, 244 x 366 cm

Caroline Larsen, “Widescreen Mountain Top”, 2017, oil on linen, 50 x 117 inches, 127 x 297 cm

Robin Williams, “Sunday Player”, 2016, oil, airbrush and acrylic and oil pastel on canvas, 62 x 46 inches, 157.5 x 117 cm

Drake Carr, “Dancer 5 / Dancer 6”, 2017, mixed media on canvas, 96 x 30 inches, 244 x 76 cm

Ben Jones, “Test Comic 3”, 2017, acryla gouache on canvas, 24 x 36 inches, 61 x 91.5 cm / “Test Comic 1”, 2017, acryla gouache and oil paint stick on canvas, 30 x 24 inches, 76 x 61 cm / “Test Comic 4”, 2017, acryla gouache on canvas, 24 x 26 inches, 61 x 91.5 cm

Ben Jones, "Brick Dog", 2017, acryla guoache on canvas, 36 x 48 inches, 91.5 x 122 cm

Ben Jones, “Brick Dog”, 2017, acryla guoache on canvas, 36 x 48 inches, 91.5 x 122 cm

Maja Djordjevic, “Untitled”, 2017, oil and enamel on canvas, 55 x 141 inches, 140 x 358 cm

Guy Yanai, “La Mortella Garden III”, 2016, oil on linen, 51 x 39.5 inches, 130 x 100 cm

Guy Yanai, “La Mortella Garden I”, 2016, oil on linen, 51 x 39.5 inches, 130 x 100 cm